Wednesday, December 25, 2013

Monday, December 23, 2013

Hey Pretty Girl ~ Marriage Proposals

I'm always searching for the stories associated with prominent events in the lives ofbride my ancestors.  The photos that I find of them are typically of 'old' people, not the young vibrant young folks that they saw in their own memories.  The stories help me envision them as young folks too.

Sometimes I find a story about them that displays their 'goofiness' or at least their humorous selves.  Their lives were more physically stressful than most of ours in our mechanized day and if portrait photos are any indication, they smiled a lot less than us.   Of course, that's if you believe the grim look on faces in the old photos to be the truth about their society.

Families love to discover the real stories behind their ancestors.  Our grandchildren love to hear the stories about their young grandma and myself.

Today, we can take videos of our significant life stories and post them in the Internet.  They say that once something is posted there, it never goes away and will haunt you forever.  Perhaps that is exactly what we want in this case.  Our digital file may disappear from our hard drives over the years, but it may survive on the storage media of Google or other large entities.  The NSA probably doesn't take requests from the public to pull up the old files though, so I guess we'll have to hope that a commercial entity's storage survives the decades and centuries.

Recently, I encountered a marriage proposal of a local man, Tyson J. Henderson to his sweetheart, Hayley Wilson that their descendants will tell and retell for generations to come.

Sorry Tyson, Kip is the better singer between the two of you.

Best wishes to Hayley and Tyson on the upcoming nuptials and may your descendants enjoy your story as much as we have in our family.

YouTube Video Tutorials and Tools for your own video uploads:youtubelogo

(c) Lee Drew 2013

Thursday, December 19, 2013

Victory Garden’s with Super Hero’s

The concept of a Victory Garden is well known in historical circles.  Victory gardens were emphasized during World War II when resources in America were dedicated to support of troops and troop support for those fighting in World War II and several subsequent wars.

We’ve seen Victory Garden posters with some frequency, but one source will surprise most folks.

Super hero’s in the form of Superman, Batman and Robin were featured on the cover of issue No. 11.

 

Batman Victory Garden

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

Garden Seed Varieties Used By Ancestors

While reading a the account book owned by my great grandparents, I noted frequentseeds entries that talked about certain varieties of berries, vegetables and fruits hat were obvious favorites in the family.

I didn't recognize most of the names of the varieties they mentioned.  I found many of them mentioned in heirloom seed catalogs.  My ancestors made their living as fruit farmers thus the mention of varieties by name gave them a 5-star thumbs up in my mind.

Several years ago we planted some of the varieties in our garden.  My great grandparents had good taste!  In some cases we had to guess what the variety is called today and may have been wrong a time or two, but our choices were good too.

Here are a few varieties that we loved.  They won't necessarily look "pretty" like most of the engineered but they taste great!

Tomatoes

  • Striped tomatoes  (Lycopersicon lycopersicum)   They are large striped tomatoes with both red, yellow, orange stripes and are surprising low in acid. 
  • Pineapple tomatoes   We chose to plant this variety just to try the taste.  I don't think they were a popular variety in the western United States  but are as good as the Striped variety and even sweeter.  Once again, don't expect perfection in shape, just in tasted.
  • Candy Cherry Tomatoes.  We love these small flavor bombs that grow in clusters.

Cucumbers

  • Lemon Cucumbers.  The name sounds like they will be bitter like the fruit but they are small round light green sweets cuke bombs.   Many cucumbers become bitter in the heat of summer but Lemon Cukes have always stayed sweet.  We plant them in large pots on the patio along side the Candy Cherry Tomatoes and several pots of mixed lettuce varieties.  Excellent summer salads are only a few steps away.

Green Beans

  • Purple Pole Beans.  We guessed at the name of the variety today and chose Purple Podded Pole Beans.  They taste great and as you'll soon hear, follow the theme of strange shapes and colors to entice young folks to taste them.
  • Rattlesnake Pole Beans.  The account book mentioned "snake beans".  What were snake beans?  We still don't know but found the variety "Rattlesnake Pole Beans" in one of the heirloom catalogs.  Is the name something new to attract attention to the variety or is it an actual name for the variety that has existed for generations?  I don't know but the beans are great.

Chard

  • Rainbow Chard.  Chard wasn't mentioned in the book but once we saw Rainbow Chard listed in seed catalogs, we knew it had to be a part of our garden.  When our grandchildren come to visit, they think they've entered the Land of OZ when their plates are piled high with strange colored and shaped vegetables.  Thanks to our descriptions of them, they actually eat them and love them.  Their parents are astounded and of course we have become a bit of a cult hero in their minds.  Its amazing how smart we've become as they grow older.

Carrots

  • Rainbow Carrots and Purple Carrots.   They are found in many heirloom catalogs.  I don't know if they were grown by my great grandparents but the varieties grown by my parents were strange looking critters with dark skins, fat bodies and a sweet taste.  Our grandchildren love the Rainbow Carrots.

Nasturtium Flowers 

  • I remember thinking my parents were poisoning themselves when they picked some flowers one day and ate them.  They had taught me how to find morel mushrooms and how to avoid all the poisonous varieties that grew in the woods near our home.  I constantly heard about what plants were poison but never once heard that you could eat some flower blossoms.  When they popped the Nasturtium blossoms in their mouth, I thought I'd soon be an orphan.  Instead, they smiled and told me how good they were with their slightly peppery taste.  Be very careful when you choose a wild plant to eat.  Most of them have natural defenses of poison.  If you don't absolutely know what you are eating, don't pop them in your mouth.

Apples

  • President Apples.  The account book and my family often refer to the President apples that were so popular on my great grandparent farm.  We don't hear of that variety now but according to the stories I've heard all of my life, they were great eating apples.

Order your heirloom seed catalogs now. 

They will make fun reading during the long winter nights in the northern hemisphere as you plan for your summer gardens.

Sunday, December 8, 2013

Genealogy Communities on Google+

December 7th was a busy day on the land.  Google released Google+ Communities to the world.   Based on the comments posted on Google+ the day before, the demand for the communities was extremely high.   Users couldn’t wait to create their own to share with the world.

That was certainly true for genealogy fans.  Membership in the new communities is rapidly growing bringing a wealth of subject matter expertise to focus as they share their knowledge, news, research methods and solutions.

Some communities have already risen to the top of my popularity list.

Genealogy Tech

google _communities_gentech

 

Family History Writers

 

FamilySearch

google _communities_familyhistorywriters   google _communities_familysearch

   

Genealogy

 

Organize – Genealogy

google _communities_organize_genealogy   google _communities_genealogy

 

There are thousands of other communities that cover the spectrum from genealogy to preparedness.

If you haven’t joined communities that include your interests, do so.  I’ve found that discussions on Google+ always seem to elicit more interaction with others and the comments tend to be well thought out and useful than on other social sites.

Wednesday, November 20, 2013

Leiden Birth, Baptisms and Deaths

I recently wrote about my Staats and Corssen ancestors, noting how pleased Iarchiefleiden_site was that church records exist for most of them in early New York Dutch church records.

One of my readers, Yvette Hoitink of the Dutch Genealogy site, sent me a kind note that pointed me to to the Archiefleiden.nl site that contains birth, baptism and marriage records for folks who lived in The Netherlands.   For some reason, I haven’t encountered this site before but it is so valuable, I need to share it with the genealogy community hoping that it will come to the attention of folks like me who are or were equally ignorant of its existence.

I use the Chrome browser with the Google Translate extension to convert the language to English because I’m language challenged.  Almost everyone will benefit from it as we encounter languages that we either can’t read or can’t read and don’t speak.

If your ancestors lived in The Netherlands during their lifetime, you’ll want to visit the Archiefleiden site soon to look for records about them.  While you are at it, be sure to visit Yvette’s site as well.

Tuesday, November 12, 2013

1885 Recipe ~ Paste For Sharpening Razors

One of the favorite book in our library is George Lowell Austin’s “Austin’sAustin's Indispensable Handbook Indispensable Handbook and General Educator”.  It was a gift from my wife’s great grandparents after we admired it early in our marriage.

Published by G. Stinson & Company in 185, the book has 719 pages of wisdom and instruction covering topics from handling a mad dog to investing in what we’d call a ponzi scheme today.  

Although the binding has almost failed, I still carefully turn its pages regularly looking for recipes and information topical to society in America in the late 1800’s to help me better understand the lives of my ancestors.

Smarting from the price of a new set of replacement razor refills after a recent foray into the isles of a local shopping club, I wondered If it was time to invest in a good straight razor, strap and shaving mug like those my father used during my youth.  I don’t recall him using anything other than the multi-strap leather blade strap to sharpen his razor over the years, but then, it could have been that I simply didn’t notice him using another method when the bevel of the blade wore more down to the square than to the long slope of a properly sharpened razor.

Planning the purchase required research.  I could call someone in a high end styling shop who might have ideas about the right models of equipment to buy but would they have the instructions for maintaining it for a lifetime of use like the tools enjoyed in the service of my father?

Enter “Austin’s Indispensable handbook and General Educator”  A search through the “Toilet Department” section of the book resulted in almost 100 recipes for scents, oils, ointments, and maintenance options, the last of which is a paste for sharpening razors.

Paste For Sharpening Razors

First procure oxide of iron (by adding carbonate of soda to a solution of persulphate of iron), wash he precipitate and finally leave it of the consistence of cream.  Spread some of the paste on soft paper very thinly with a soft brush; cut the paper in pieces two inches square, dry and use for shaving papers.

And there it is ….  a recipe to give a fine edge to a razor.  I’m not sure I’ll find the elements of the recipe easily today, but that may be because I don’t know what to look for or where to find them.  For all I know, they may be commonly found on the shelf at any drug store..  We’ll see how the quest goes.  It should be a fun excursion and will undoubted create more than one interesting conversation with store personnel.

In the end, I’ll have a few more tools that work when the power goes out and maybe I’ll even learn and experience a little from the styling life of my grandfathers.

Thursday, October 17, 2013

History of the Joseph's coat rose bush

Joseph's Coat Roses
People have been impressed with the size and quality of my Jacob's coat rose bush.  Here is the history of my bush.
 
It was originally planted  by my Great Grandmother Mary Ann Limb Young on her farm in Huntington, Utah.  She planted it from a start her mother gave her when she got married.  This was from Beaver, Utah.  She lived in a log cabin on the farm.  She later moved a start to her first home in Huntington Utah.
 
When my grandmother and grandfather Young moved into her house, she gave starts to her daughter-in-laws.  My mother got her first start when we moved into a home in Edgemont Utah.  She later took a start to her two homes in American Fork.
 
When she moved into her condo in American Fork Utah.  I dug up the whole plant and moved it to our house in American Fork.  I later took a start to Orangeville, Utah where it grew for two years.  When we moved into our new home.  I took the plant with me.  It has grown in this spot for 25 years.
 
Some of my daughters have taken starts of this plant.  Some have grown and some haven't.  I hope to save some starts for my grandchildren.  That will be seven generations that will benefit from this one rose bush.

Wednesday, September 11, 2013

Sunday, September 1, 2013

Monday, June 10, 2013

The Logie Surname and Early Family Members

The below treatise on the Logie surname was sent to me years ago.  I don’t knowsurname the authors name but thank them for their work collecting this information about the Logie surname and some of the early day ancestors of the family.

Various Spellings used within the same family:- Logy, Loge, Loggy, Loggie, Logie, there is also some evidence to suggest that the name Logue may also apply to some descendants- it must be remembered that in these earlier times names were written as they appeared phonetically to the writer,  even within my own family four different spellings were used at the first four christenings of the children of one of  my ancestors, even in one case  the child spelt one way and the father a different way, bear in mind this was even with the same person writing down the details.

1260- Sir Malisius de Logy “the Steward of Stratherne”
Ragman’s Roll
                                  John of Logy  (under age)
                 Wauter de Logy  of Fife
1296- Malise de Loghis - committed to Gloucester Castle-(son of Sir Malisius de Logy)
Sir John Logy- executed
Phillip de Logy- appears as charter witness in Dundee
record of Payment to Phillip de Logy, Burgess of Dundee
Charter by Murdock, Earl of Mentieth to Robert Logie of the lands of Broculli in Fife.  Note:- Robert was a son of Malise de Logy and apparently a brother of Sir John of Logy who was executed, Murdock, Earl of Mentieth had a sister who married Malise, Earl of Strathearn.

David ll Married Margaret Logie, widow of Sir John of Logie.
The Lands of Annandale given in seisin to John of Logie, son of the Queen of Scotland by David ll .  These were not the lands originally held by Sir John of Logy. An extract from The Scots Peerage by Sir James Balfour Paul, LLD., Lord Lyon King of Arms, reads- “In 1823 the lands of Strathgartney were granted to Sir John Menteith who had married a niece of Robert l.  These lands had previously belonged to Sir John Logie and were taken away from him by forfeiture in 1320.”  The lands of Strathgartney lie along the north bank of Loch Katrine.

John Hay of Tullibody, marquis of Tweedale, paid 100 marks to John Logy for the marriage of his daughter Margaret Logie.
Extract from the Red Book of Menteith, Vol 1 pp 148/149

The lands of Annandale given in seisin to John of Logie, son of  the Queen of Scotland by David ll,  the extract from Bain’s Index reads-“Dec.16,1366, on that day the King of Scotland, Sir Archibald Douglas, and other Lords of Scotland came to Annandale and gave seisin of it to John de Logie, son of the Queen of Scotland”.

These were not the lands originally held by Sir John of Logy, of the Soulis conspiracy. An extract from The Scots Peerage by Sir James Balfour Paul, LLD,. Lord Lyon King of Arms, reads-“In 1323 the lands of Strathgartney were granted to Sir John Monteith who had married a niece of Robert l.  These lands had previously belonged to Sir John Logie and were taken away from him by forfeiture in 1320”.  The lands of Strathgartney lie along the North bank of Loch Katrine.

A dispute having arisen between the Earl of Fife and Menteith and Menteith and John of Logy, in which the lands called in question the right of the Earl to the possession of the lands of Logy and Strathgartney, the matter was referred to the arbitration of Andrew Mercer, lord of Meiklour.  These lands had belong to Sir John Logy who was executed for taking part in the conspiracy of William     Soulis against King Robert the Bruce, while his estates were forfeited to the crown,.  The lands of Logy seem to have been given to the Earl of Douglas, while those of Strathgartney were bestowed on Sir John of Menteith and Elene of Mar, his spouse.

Notwithstanding the possession of Strathgartney by Sir John of Menteith,  David ll issued a precept for infefting John of Logy, the son of the late Sir John of Logy, in these lands, but afterwards, on being informed by his council of the reasons for Sir John’s forfeiture he recalled the infeftment and restored Strathgartney to Sir John of Menteith.  Not long after the  King’s marriage to Margaret of Logy, John of Logy received from him the lands of Logy by a new grant.  How they, with the lands of Strathgartney came to be in possession of Sir Robert Stewart, does not appear but that they were, is evident from the indenture of arbitration drawn up at the instance of Andrew Mercer.  The Lord of Meiklour after hearing the parties adjudged that the lands belonged to John of Logy, and the Earl, having agreed to abide by the decision of the arbiter, at once transferred the lands to him with due formalities.  The agreement and decision was made known to King Robert ll, and affirmed in the presence of the Court by the Earl of Fife and Menteith and John of Logy, and when the men of Strathgartney were inclined to demur to the claims made upon them by their new Lord.

The Earl of Fife and Menteith wrote to them, that although he had previously prohibited them from obeying John of Logy, their Lord, before the latter had made good his claims to the lands, they should now serve as their lawful Lord.  This arrangement between the Earl of Fife and Menteith and John of Logy was sacredly kept by both parties, it is interesting to note that John of Logy was chamberlain to the Duke of Rothesay while he was Earl of Carrick”

Duncan Logy released from Norwich prison
           John of Logy released from Colchester prison

Alexander Logy admitted Burgess of Aberdeen
 
Thomas Hay of Logie, who was slain at Flodden with his brother on September 9, 1513,  married in 1493 Margaret Logie, heiress of Logiealmond in Perthshire, of which lands he had a charter upon his resignation, and precept from King James lV for infefting him and her in the barony on October 4, 1493.  She survived him and married Robert Murray.  By her first marriage Margaret had a son George, who became 7th Earl of Errol, and a daughter, Beatrix, who married Walter Bonar of Keltie.

NOTE:- Margaret Logie was the daughter  of John Logie of Logiealmond and Euphemia Boyd.  Euphemia was the daughter of Alexander Boyd, Earl of Kilmarnock at that time.  It would appear that this was a marriage of cousins as in 1368 a Thomas Hay of Tullibody married Margaret Logie—see entry under that date.  The Hay family thus gained these lands previously owned by that branch of the Logie family.

It should be noted that at this time in Scotland heritable property passed to the eldest child irrespective of sex and that therefore when the eldest child was a female the lands would pass to her and then to her husband and children.

Monday, May 13, 2013

Logie Family Tombstones in Burnt Church, Canada

One of my Logie cousins, George Kingston, sent the below list of family tombstone transcriptions prior to his passing.  The tombstones are found in the First Church Presbyterian Cemetery in Burnt Church, Northumberland, New Brunswick Canada.  His note in its entirety is shown below.  The CWL initials denote another Logie cousin,  Charles Logie:.

Records for the majority if not all of the people mentioned in the inscriptions can be found on my FamHist Genealogy site.  Click on the link for John Anderson below to see his record and a site search tool or click on this link for the full search screen.

“A list of those buried in The "FIRST BURNT CHURCH PRESBYTERIAN CEMETERY , Burnt Church Road, Alnwick Parish, Northumberland Co, NB Is included here.

(PLEASE NOTE THAT I GEORGE KINGSTON HAVE ADDED THE (CWL ) AND OTHER NOTES IN BRACKETS FOR MY IDENTIFICATION PURPOSES, THESE WERE NOT ON THE ORIGONAL. I HAVE ALSO COMBINED TWO SEPARATE LISTS FOR THE ABOVE CEMETERY. THE SECOND LIST CONTAINS THE SAME NAMES, IS A LIST OF TRANSCRIPTIONS (INSCRIPTIONS) ON THE HEAD STONES )

ANDERSON, Elizabeth (see Davidson, (CWL AS77) Robert)

ANDERSON, John, d. 2 Oct 1874 aged 60 yrs; his wife Marjary, ((CWL AC36) Loggie) d. 23 Feb 1879 aged 62 yrs.

Transcription "MEMORY JOHN ANDERSON WHO DIED OCTOBER 2, 1874 AGED 60 YEARS ALSO HIS WIFE MARJARY DIED FEB. 23, 1879 AGED 62 YEARS.

Location Third Row Number 14 Grave Number 14

ANDERSON, William, 6 Apr 1803 - Aug 1857; James Anderson, 6 May 1806 - 25 Nov 1866.

Transcription "IN MEMORY OF WILLIAM ANDERSON BORN APRIL 6, 1803 DIED AUG. 10, 1857 JAMES ANDERSON BORN MAY 6, 1806 DIED NOV. 25 1866 (FOOT MARKER W.A. - J.A.)

Location Third Row Number 15 Grave Number 15

Bell, Jane M (see McKnight, Josepoh)

BELL, Walter, d. 7 Nov 1854 aged 52 yrs.

Transcription " WALTER BELL DIED NOV. 7, 1854 AGED 52 YEARS (FOOT MARKER W.B.)

Location Fourth Row Number 20 Grave Number 20.

CAMPBELL, Mary (see Morrison, Mary (Campbell))

CASSIDY, John, d. 29 Jan 1872 in 74th yr, a native of Nova Scotia; his wife Mary Anderson, 24 May 1808 - 28 Feb 1901.

Transcription "IN MEMORY OF JOHN CASSIDY WHO DIED JAN. 29, 1872 IN HIS 74th YEAR A NATIVE OF NOVA SCOTIA (NEXT LINE NOT LEGIBLE) HIS WIFE MARY ANDERSON BORN MAY 24, 1808 Died Feb. 28, 1901 (FOOT MARKER J.C.)

Location Fifth Row Number 25 Grave Number 25

DAVIDSON, Helen, 1811 - 1905.

Transcription " HELEN DAVIDSON 1811 - 1905.

Location Fourth Row Number 23 Grave Number 23.

DAVIDSON, (CWL AC38) Jane, wife of Peter (CWL AS76) Davidson, d. 22 Jun 1864 aged 41 yrs; also George (CWL AC44) Davidson, d. 12 Dec 1878 aged 28 yrs; A (CWL AC42) Davidson, d. 14 Jul 1862 aged 1 yr; also Peter (CWL AS76) Davidson, d 28 Jun 1884 aged 80 yrs (Peter married Jane (CWL AC38) Loggie)

Transcription (Front Side) "IN MEMORY OF JANE WIFE OF PETER DAVIDSON WHO DIED JUNE 22, 1864 AGED 41 Years

Transcription (Left Side) "IN MEMORY OF GEORGE DAVIDSON WHO DIED DEC. 12, 1878 AGED 28 YEARS, A. DAVIDSON WHO DIED JULY 14, 1862 Aged 1 YEAR

Transcription (Right Side) "IN MEMORY OF PETER DAVIDSON WHO DIED JUNE 28, 1884 AGED 80 Years

Location Fourth Row Number 19 Grave Number 19.

DAVIDSON, Peter (see Davidson, Jane)

DAVIDSON, (CWL AS77) Robert, 30 Mar 1800 - 8 Oct 1886; his wife Elizabeth Anderson, 1 Apr 1810 - 21 May 1884.

Transcription "IN MEMORY OF ROBERT BORN - MARCH 30, 1800 DIED - OCT. 8, 1886 ALSO HIS WIFE ELIZABETH ANDERSON BORN - APRIL 1, 1810 DIED - MAY 21, 1884 DAVISON (FOOT MARKERS - R.D. - E.A.)

Location Third Row Number 9 Grave number 9

DAVIDSON, Thomas A H, 3 Jun 1854 - 29 Jul 1854; George H, 15 Oct 1850 - 15 Aug 1855; Ann, 18 Sept 1855 - 20 Oct 1855; Catherine, 25 Mar1849 - 6 Jul 1863, Children of George & Marguerite Davidson.

Transcription "IN MEMORY OF THOMAS A. H. BORN- JUNE 3, 1854 DIED- JULY 29, 1854

GEORGE H. BORN- OCT. 15, 1850 DIED- AUG. 15 1855

ANN BORN- SEPT. 18, 1855 DIED- OCT. 20, 1855

CATHERINE BORN- MARCH 25, 1849 DIED- JULY 6, 1863

(CHILDREN OF GEORGE + MARGUERITE DAVIDSON)

Location Second Row Number 5 Grave Number 5

DAVIDSON, (CWL AC39) William, 10 Oct 1848 - 15 Jun 1906; his wife Janet (CWL AP07) Morrison, 24 Aug 1845 - May 1895.

Transcription "WILLIAM DAVIDSON BORN - OCT. 10, 1848 DIED - JUNE 15, 1906 HIS WIFE JANET (CWL AP07) BORN AUG. 24, 1845 DIED MAY 31, 1895.

Location Fourth Row Number 18 Grave Number 18.

HAMILTON, John, d. 4 Jun 1845 aged 39 yrs.

(Transcription "IN MEMORY OF JOHN HAMILTON WHO DIED JUNE 4, 1845 AGED- 39 YEARS , Location First Row Number 1 Grave Number 1 - LEFT HAND SIDE ( SOUTH))

JARDINE, Jane (see McKnight, Francis M)

LOGGIE, Alexander, (CWL AA20) d 28 Mar 1852 aged 78 yrs; Helen (Murray) Loggie, d. 9 Jun 1852 aged 78 yrs: their son Robert, (CWL AA24 Loggie) d. 13 May 1873, aged 69 yrs; (Note here by George Kingston;- Robert d. 13 May 1873 Never married, I George Kingston have added the (CWL ????) as well as the s/o notes below),

Also (buried here) ( Alexander (2 (CWL AG90)) Loggie 25 Dec 1845 - 25 Dec 1875 (s/o Alexander (CWL AA30) Loggie);

John (CWL AG92) Loggie 1 Feb 1849 - 11 Oct 1876; (s/o Alexander (CWL AA30) Loggie);

Jessie (CWL AG97)Loggie, 1859 - 1892; (d/o Alexander (CWL AA30) Loggie);

Alexander 1 (CWL AG87) Loggie d. 8 Oct 1844 aged 5 years; (s/o Alexander (CWL AA30) Loggie);

Donald (CWL AG88) Loggie, d. 20 Oct 1844 aged 3yrs 9 mos; (s/o Alexander (CWL AA30) Loggie); also

Robert (CWL AG95) Loggie, d. Sept 1856 aged 1yr 3 mo. (s/o Alexander (CWL AA30) Loggie).

(Note by GLK:- Please note that Alexander (CWL AA30) Is apparently not buried here although some of his very close relatives are buried here)

Transcription (Front Side) ALEXANDER LOGGIE DIED- MARCH 28, 1852 AGED- 78 YEARS.

Also HELEN LOGGIE DIED JUNE 9 1852 AGED 75 YEARS

Also THEIR SON ROBERT DIED- MAY 13 1873 AGED 69 YEARS

Transcription (Left Side) ALEXANDER LOGGIE BORN- DEC 25, 1845 DIED- DEC 25, 1875

Also JOHN LOGGIE BORN- FEB 1, 1849 DIED- OCT 11 1876

Also JESSIE LOGGIE BORN- 1859 DIED- 1892

Transcription (Right Side) Also ALEXANDER LOGGIE DIED- OCT. 8 1844 AGED 5 YEARS

Also DONALD LOGGIE DIED- OCT. 20, 1844 AGED 3 YEARS- 9 MONTHS

Also ROBERT LOGGIE DIED- SEPT. 1856 AGED- 1 YEAR- 3 MONTHS.

Location Second Row Number 4 Grave Number 4 Left Hand Side (South)

LOGGIE, (CWL AA32) Elizabeth (see Morrison, Margary)

LOGGIE, (CWL AC49) Finley M, d. 4 May 1880 aged 28 yrs; also John V (CWL AC50) Loggie, d. Jul 1886 aged 32 yrs.

Transcription "FINLEY M. LOGGIE DIED MAY 4, 1880 AGED 28 YEARS JOHN V. LOGGIE DIED JULY 1886 AGED 32 YEARS.

Location Third Row number 13 Grave Number 13

LOGGIE, (CWL AC37) George, d. Apr 1869 aged 48 yrs.

Transcription "TO THE MEMORY OF GEORGE LOGGIE WHO DIED APRIL 16, 1869 AGED 48 YEARS (POEM FOLLOWS) (FOOT MARKER G. L.)

Location Third Row Number 12 Grave Number 12

LOGGIE, Jane, wife of George Loggie, d. 22 Jan 1858 aged 72 yrs. ( Note by GLK:- Jane is called Ann in Transcription document)

Transcription " ANN WIFE OF GEORGE LOGGIE DIED JAN. 22, 1858 AGED 72 YEARS (BROKEN FOOT MARKER- A. L.)

Location Third Row Number 11 Grave Number 11

LOGGIE, (CWL AC32) Peter, 1809 - 1873; Phebe Murray, 1820 - 1874; Their children, Charles, (CWL AD45) 1846 - 1877; John, (CWL AD43) 1853 - 1877

Transcription "PETER LOGGIE 1809 - 1873, PHEBE MURRAY 1820 - 1874, THEIR CHILDREN CHARLES 1846 - 1877 JOHN 1853 - 1877.

Location Fifth Row Number 27 Grave Number 27.

LOGGIE, (CWL AA33) Peter, d. 8 Nov 1857 aged 38 yrs.

In a Plot, Transcription "IN MEMORY OF PETER LOGGIE WHO DIED NOV. 8, 1857 AGED - 38 YEARS FOOT MARKER-- PL. Location Second Row Number 3 Grave Number 3

LOGGIE, (CWL AA34) William, d. 16 Nov 1844 aged 65 yrs a native of Morayshire, Scot.; his wife Jane, d 13 Aug 1865 aged 84 yrs.

Transcription "IN MEMORY OF WILLIAM LOGGIE DIED - NOV. 16, 1844 AGED 65 YEARS A NATIVE OF MURRAYSHIRE, SCOTLAND ALSO HIS WIFE JANE DIED - AUG. 13, 1865 AGED 84 YEARS (FOOT MARKERS _ W. L. - J. L.)

Location Thied Row Number 10 Grave Number 10

MORRISON, James Calvin, d. 1 Aug 1892 age 8 mos; Peter Arnold, d. 20 Oct 1898 aged 8 days, sons of James & Margaret (Young) Morrison.

Transcription " MORRISON JAMES CALVIN DIED AUG. 1, 1892 AGED 8 MONTHS, PETER ARNOLD (MORRISON) DIED OCT. 20 1898 AGED 8 DAYS (SONS OF JAMES AND MARGARET "YOUNG" MORRISON.

Location Fourth Row Number 24 Grave Number 24

MORRISON, (CWL AP07) Janet (see Davidson, (CWL AC39) William)

MORRISON, John, 1810 - 1879

Transcription "JOHN MORRISON 1810 - 1879.

Location Fourth Row Number 22 Grave Number 22

MORRISON, Margaret, d 20 Mar 1860 aged 25 yrs; Mary Morrison, d. 10 Mar 1867 aged 29 yrs.

Transcription "TO THE MEMORY OF MARGARET MORRISON WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE MARCH 20, 1860 AGED 25 YEARS MARY MORRISON WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE MARCH 10, 1867 AGED 29 YEARS

Location Third Row Number 16 Grave Number 16

MORRISON, (CWL AG80) Margary, d 10 Jan 1875 aged 20 yrs; Ellen (CWL AP13 ?)Morrison, d. May 1912 aged 73 yrs; also Alexander Morrison, a native of Perthshire, Scot., emig to Miramichi 1820, d. 22 Jun 1880 aged 70 yrs; his wife Elizabeth (CWL AA32) Loggie, d. 7 Dec 1905 aged 88 yrs.

Transcription (Front Side) "MEMORY OF MARGARY MORRISON WHO DIED JAN. 10, 1875 AGED 20 YEARS ELLEN MORRISON DIED MAY 1912 AGED 73 YEARS (FOOT MARKERS M.M. - E.M.)

Transcription (Left Side) "MEMORY OF ALEXANDER MORRISON A NATIVE OF PERTHSHIRE SCOTLAND EMIGRATED TO MIRAMICHI IN 1820 AND DEPARTED THIS LIFE 22 JUNE 1880 AGED 70 YEARS HIS WIFE ELIZABETH LOGGIE DIED DEC 7, 1905 AGED 88 YEARS

Location Third Row Number 17 Grave Number 17

MORRISON, Mary (Campbell), wife of Peter Morrison Esq., d. 29 Nov 1854, born at Milltown of Finlarig, Perthshire, Scot., 1782; Peter Morrison, Esq., a native of Perthshire, Scot., who emig. in 1818, d. 11 Nov 1869 aged 89 yrs.

MORRISON, Peter Esq. (see Morrison, Mary (CAMPBELL))

Transcription (Front Side) "TO THE MEMORY OF MARY CAMPBELL SPOUSE OF PETER MORRISON ESQ WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE NOV. 29, 1854, DECEASED WAS BORN AT MILLTOWN OF FINLARIG PERTHSHIRE, SCOTLAND --1782

Transcription (Left Side) "IN MEMORY OF PETER MORRISON ESQ. A NATIVE OF PERTHSHIRE SCOTLAND WHO EMIGRATED TO MIRAMICHI - 1818 AND DEPARTED THIS LIFE THE 11th, OF NOVEMBER --1869 AGED-- 89 YEARS

Location Second Row Number 6 Grave Number 6

MURRAY, Phebe (see Loggie, (CWL AC32) Peter)

McK, J. (Foot Marker) (Note by GLK this name is presumed to be McKnight ?)

Transcription "J. McK. (FOOT MARKER)

Location Fifth Row Number 28 Grave number 28

McKNIGHT, Francis M, 25 Jan 1801 - 20 Aug 1863; his wife Jane Jardine, 3 Apr 1810 - 23 Jan 1878; also James McKnight, 11 Jun 1851 - 7 Nov 1857; James McKnight, 22 Sep 1860 - 21 Oct 1880.

Transcription (Front Side) "IN MEMORY OF FRANCIS M. MCKNIGHT BORN JAN. 25, 1801 DIED AUG. 20, 1863 ALSO HIS WIFE JANE JARDINE BORN APRIL 3, 1810 DIED JAN. 23, 1878

Transcription (Left Side) "IN MEMORY OF JAMES McKNIGHT BORN JUNE 11, 1851 DIED NOV. 7, 1857,

JAMES McKNIGHT BORN SEPT. 22, 1860 DIED OCT. 21, 1880 (FOOT MARKER FATHER)

Steel Pin (FOOT MARKER MOTHER)

Steel Pin (FOOT MARKER J. McKNIGHT)

Location Fifth Row Numbers 29, 30 & 31 Graves Number 29 & 31

McKNIGHT, James (see McKnight, Francis M)

McKNIGHT, Josepoh, d. 29 Mar 1895 aged 58 yrs; his wife Jane M Bell, d. 10 Aug 1901 aged 60yrs.

Transcription " IN MEMORY OF JOSEPH McNIGHT DIED MARCH 29, 1895 AGED 58 YEARS ALSO HIS BELOVED WIFE JANE M. BELL DIED AUG. 10, 1901 AGED 60 YEARS.

Location Fourth Row Number 21 Grave Number 21

McLEAN, Francis F (see Sewell, Janet M)

McLEAN, Geo. W, 1866 - 1907.

(Transcription ""IN MEMORY OF GEO. W. McLEAN BORN - 1866 DIED -1907". Location First Row Number 2 Grave Number 2

MacLEAN, Thomas A, 1870 - 1934; his wife Margaret Jane Sewell, 1890 - 1957; G12284, Pte D Earle, KIA in Holland on 13 Oct 1944; also Frances, Robert, Ann, Jessie.

Transcription "THOMAS A. MacLEAN 1870 - 1934 HIS WIFE MARGARET JANE SEWELL 1890 - 1957 G. 12284 PTE. D. EARLE KILLED IN ACTION IN HOLLAND OCT. 13, 1944 FRANCES, ROBERT, ANN, JESSIE (GONE BUT NOT FORGOTTEN)

Location Third Row Number 7 Grave Number 7

SEWELL, Janet M, wife of Francis F McLean, 1874 - 1906.

Transcription "IN MEMORY OF JANET M. SEWELL WIFE OF FRANCIS F. McLEAN BORN - 1874 DIED - 1906

Location Third Row number 8 Grave Number 8

SIMPSON, William, d. 25 Dec 1869 aged 34 yrs; his wife Ellen, d 20 Feb 1879 aged 44 yrs.

Transcription " THERE IS REST IN MEMORY OF WILLIAM SIMPSON DIED DEC. 25 1869 AGED 34 YEARS ALSO HIS WIFE ELLEN DIED FEB. 20, 1879 AGED 44 YEARS (FOOT MARKER W.S - E.S.)

Location Fifth Row Number 26 Grave Number 26”

When Aliens Enter Your Ancestral Tree

Almost six years after taking a DNA test to help some cousins who hoped to tie to myflying_saucer2 proven lineage, there still aren’t any matches to their branch of the family … or to any other known family on earth apparently.

My genealogy friends constantly bombard me with notes about the DNA matches that surface to their own DNA ancestral trees.  They laugh with delight relating stories of lost cousins coming out of the woodwork offering to join with them in cousins research teams.  The research progress in some cases has been nothing short of phenomenal.

I rejoice with them happy for their success but in truth with a bit of sadness that my progenitors from Sagittarius or the Large Magellanic Cloud don’t drop by and leave a report of my lineage on an indestructible disk or Vulcan mind transfer.

It has been enjoyable listening to experts tell me that my DNA results are impossible or at least extremely unlikely.   At times, it almost seems that face-to-face contact and handshakes aren’t enough to prove the reality of my existence to them.  I laugh at the expression on their face when I wish them well asking them to contact me after they are ‘taken up’ to the mother ship  and the big eyed guys on it teach them about DNA on a galactic scale.

Of course it could be that I descend from a hidden race that has lived in the frozen north of Siberia or the tropical heat of the Amazon or maybe just the backwaters of Devonshire.  Who knows? 

If I can’t enjoy the benefits of DNA tree matching, at least have a good story to tell from the testing process.

How are you doing with your own DNA tests?  Are you finding extended cousins and locations where your ancestors congregated?  Test results come back a lot faster now than when I took my test.  The DNA test results databases have grown remarkably giving us a much greater chance of find ‘our’ related kin.

I’ll watch for the next planetary or astronomical alignment then look skyward for a descending spacecraft that is bringing the answers to my own DNA questions.   When that happens, I’ll try to post the results.  Don’t put off doing something you need to do waiting for that day though….  You could die of old age while waiting in place….

Live long and prosper…